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Author Topic: Skate laces...how long? - fsf  (Read 8334 times)

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Offline JimStanmore

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Skate laces...how long? - fsf
« on: September 02, 2010, 10:10:06 PM »
johns135
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Post Title: Skate laces .. how long ?
Posted: 02-26-2010, 07:44 PM

 I use to know this, but age is age. Size is Riedell Men's Goldstar 6 1/2 W.
I'm trying to buy Nylon-cotten combos for my Goldstars, and Rainbo is
treating my like I'm from Mars. Their Braided combos go up to 120 inches.
I vaguely remember something about 150 inches ??? And Riedell.com
never heard of skate laces or Goldstars :-) Pro Shop here doesn't sell ..
.... "laces" ... ??

johns  

sk8tmum
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Posted: 02-26-2010, 07:59 PM

 Riedell laces range from 72 to 120 inches. The Riedell skate that you are wearing has now morphed sortof/kind of into the Riedell 875, if that helps. Rainbo does seem to have the Braidlace laces, which we use; they are decent quality, and they do go up to 120 inches. Now, my DS is in size 10-1/2 Klings, and the 120's are more than long enough to go around the convoluted hooks and that which are used on those; my DD is in size 7-1/2 in Riedell ladies Goldstars, and I believe she has 120" inch laces on hers.  

johns135
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Posted: 02-27-2010, 12:25 AM

 Thanks. I'll order both combos at 120. Probably pay more for the shipping
than the laces :-)

johns  

NCSkater02
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Posted: 02-27-2010, 08:53 AM

 Quote:
Originally Posted by johns135  
Thanks. I'll order both combos at 120. Probably pay more for the shipping
than the laces :-)

johns
 
 
That's when I'd talk myself into buying something else that would make it more cost efficient...  

Query
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Posted: 02-27-2010, 10:39 AM

 The length that works depends on the shape of your feet, not just the boot size. I need a longer length than Klingbeil sent mine with.

If you've got old laces... remove and measure them! Of course, if the ends are frayed, and they aren't nylon, you may never get them back in the boots.

If the old ones are nylon, and an end is frayed, you can just partly melt the end with a match and roll it into something small enough and hard enough to fit through the lace holes. Be near a sink, because they sometimes catch fire, and be careful not to burn your fingers when you roll it.

In fact, you can spend $1500 or so on new boots and blades, but not feel guilty about it, by saving $2 by fixing your old laces.

If you could stand pure nylon, you can find also sorts of very colorful small diameter cords at an outdoor (camping) store - e.g., "parachute cord", and the smallest cords in the Climbing department, or what they call "custom boot laces". You can cut all of them to the required length, and melt and roll the ends as described above. (Custom boot laces typically come with press on ends - but they are too large to fit through my lace holes, so I need to melt and roll to produce my own ends.)

But what is the advantage of nylon/cotton blend?  

renatele
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Posted: 02-27-2010, 04:35 PM

 Quote:
Originally Posted by Query  
But what is the advantage of nylon/cotton blend?
 
 
Nylon laces stretch too much, and slip too much. I, for example, like to have different tension on different parts of the foot, and nylon laces would not let me do that - they slide and the tension equalizes over the whole area.  

Isk8NYC
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Posted: 02-27-2010, 04:44 PM

 Hate, hate, hate nylon. Bah. I don't think saving $2 will offset spending $1500 on new boots and blades. Just mho.

When I'm in a pro shop that has the cotton/poly blend I prefer, I pick up a few pair for the kids' skates and for my own. If I have to order off the internet, I buy several pairs along with whatever else I'm buying.

I usually replace the kids' laces before competitions. It makes the skates look nicer and feel tighter. I also don't worry about broken laces.  

Layne
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Posted: 02-28-2010, 10:59 AM

 Quote:
Originally Posted by renatele  
Nylon laces stretch too much, and slip too much. I, for example, like to have different tension on different parts of the foot, and nylon laces would not let me do that - they slide and the tension equalizes over the whole area.
 
 
Do you lace over or under the hooks? I was told by a boot fitter that you should go over because it makes all the gaps between the laces equal (if you compare side by side you can see it's true), but it also has the side effect of binding the laces better since they cross themselves right next to each hook.  

Isk8NYC
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Posted: 02-28-2010, 11:32 AM

 I lace over and use a half-knot between the eyelets and the hooks.

Nylon laces always slip and redistribute the tension.
Plus, they cut the **** out of my fingers.  

sk8tmum
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Posted: 02-28-2010, 12:34 PM

 Quote:
Originally Posted by Isk8NYC  
I lace over and use a half-knot between the eyelets and the hooks.

Nylon laces always slip and redistribute the tension.
Plus, they cut the **** out of my fingers.
 
 
ITA on the above; also on the purchase of multiple pairs, especially black ones, as not every pro shop carries black skate laces, and I've been at a few competitions where the travelling "merchants" don't carry the black ones either.

We don't replace right before the competition though - we do it a few days before - as that way there's no chance of the boot not feeling quite "right" if the tension on the newly inserted laces hasn't been worked in as yet.

Having seen the disaster that can strike with snapped laces during a competition in the Men's comp at the Olympics ... I am so going to be checking the laces before competition!

Somewhat OT - we put the new Jerry's laces with the rhinestones on them in both of my DD's skates recently: they look really nice, and are very subtle but attractive on the ice. Plus, my kids have been pursued down hallways by skaters who want to know WHERE they got them!  

Kat12
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Posted: 02-28-2010, 09:35 PM

 Is there such a thing as all-cotton laces? I was thinking of getting a pair and looking up somebody that makes tie-dye shirts and having them tie-dye the laces for me.  

PinkLaces
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Posted: 02-28-2010, 10:10 PM

 Quote:
Originally Posted by sk8tmum  
ITA on the above; also on the purchase of multiple pairs, especially black ones, as not every pro shop carries black skate laces, and I've been at a few competitions where the travelling "merchants" don't carry the black ones either.

We don't replace right before the competition though - we do it a few days before - as that way there's no chance of the boot not feeling quite "right" if the tension on the newly inserted laces hasn't been worked in as yet.

Having seen the disaster that can strike with snapped laces during a competition in the Men's comp at the Olympics ... I am so going to be checking the laces before competition!

Somewhat OT - we put the new Jerry's laces with the rhinestones on them in both of my DD's skates recently: they look really nice, and are very subtle but attractive on the ice. Plus, my kids have been pursued down hallways by skaters who want to know WHERE they got them!
 
 
I should've done that. I had a lace come loose during the middle of my program in a competition today. I had google search the rhinestone laces. I am all about the cool laces. I had pink ones in my skates until a few months ago when I got new skates.  

Isk8NYC
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Posted: 03-01-2010, 08:10 AM

 Quote:
Originally Posted by Kat12  
Is there such a thing as all-cotton laces? I was thinking of getting a pair and looking up somebody that makes tie-dye shirts and having them tie-dye the laces for me.  
 
 
All-cotton laces are hard to find. Rainbo sometimes has them, but not on the website. You have to call their 800- number to order them.

I use a cotton-poly blend lace because the all-cotton laces are a little too thick for the eyelets. They hold tension well, but they also "saw at" the skate eyelets, which makes the eyelets larger.

I've dyed the cotton-poly laces in the past. They come out a little lighter than the all-cotton laces. I was just making beige laces because they're REALLY difficult to find in the right color for my old Klingbeils. Klingbeil's "tan" skate color is different from SP-Teri's "tan" skate color. There are plenty of beige polyester laces on the market, but not many with cotton in the mix. (Formula: strong coffee used to brew strong tea + a few drops blue food coloring to counter the orange color from the coffee/tea.)

The biggest problem with dying laces is that the dye works it way under the aglet - the plastic lace tip. That makes it loose and can even damage it, which is a PITA when you're trying to force it through a tight spot like a thick pair of figure skates.

I've had good luck with melting candle wax onto the lace right near the aglet, so that there's a barrier protecting it from the dye. Then you have to keep the ends out of the dye as well.

Dying laces is a ridiculous waste of my time, but it is a fun project if you're not in a rush and like doing crafts. I actually switched from beige skates to white skates because I was tired of dying white laces to match my skates.

This is a fascinating site: http://www.fieggen.com/shoelace/agletrepair.htm  

rlichtefeld
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Posted: 03-01-2010, 10:17 AM

 Quote:
Originally Posted by johns135  
I use to know this, but age is age. Size is Riedell Men's Goldstar 6 1/2 W.
I'm trying to buy Nylon-cotten combos for my Goldstars, and Rainbo is
treating my like I'm from Mars. Their Braided combos go up to 120 inches.
I vaguely remember something about 150 inches ??? And Riedell.com
never heard of skate laces or Goldstars :-) Pro Shop here doesn't sell ..
.... "laces" ... ??

johns
 
 
Have you tried to unlace one of your boots and measure how long the current lace is?

Rob  

renatele
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Posted: 03-01-2010, 07:49 PM

 Quote:
Originally Posted by Layne  
Do you lace over or under the hooks? I was told by a boot fitter that you should go over because it makes all the gaps between the laces equal (if you compare side by side you can see it's true), but it also has the side effect of binding the laces better since they cross themselves right next to each hook.
 
 
Over. And I use cotton/poly blend laces (my fitter says that nylon laces should be used for the first 20 hours or so, while boots are being broken in).  


Offline JimStanmore

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Re: Skate laces...how long?
« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2010, 10:10:33 PM »
Kat12
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Posted: 03-01-2010, 08:26 PM

 I was told over too because supposedly the laces loosen less. Couldn't tell you if that's true because I've never not done it that way. Besides, when I do mine I do a surgeon's knot in between each set of eyelets rather than just crossing it (like the first half of a square knot like you do when tying your shoes, only cross twice instead of once). I figured that'd make them more secure. And really, if I didn't do it, I can only imagine how much lace I'd have left over at the end! 

srogers
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Post Title: How long?
Posted: 05-13-2010, 12:19 AM

 I wanted to find that too - without pulling the current laces because the aglets are buggered up and it's going to be tough to re-lace 'em. But my Reidell 320 boots size 10.5 have 112" laces. If that helps anyone 

drskater
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Posted: 05-13-2010, 12:42 AM

 Quote:
Originally Posted by Isk8NYC 

Nylon laces always slip and redistribute the tension.
Plus, they cut the **** out of my fingers.
 
 
ITA here too! I had nylons for about two weeks this year and I vowed never again. I go with the 120'' but I can tuck extra lace under my footless tights, which may not be an option for the lads. 

Query
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Posted: 05-13-2010, 02:50 PM

 This is going to sound really dumb, but that never stopped me before:

Take another lace or string, and place it above the existing lace, one part of a time, tracing the route the existing lace takes underneath. Keep your fingers over the new lace or string at each hole, so it doesn't slip. Measure the length required.

You only need to trace half the route (i.e., half the bottom straight part, and up only one side of the boot), then multiply by 2.

If you want to get fancy, and you feel you could get away with an inch or two less than you have now, or you need an extra inch or two to tie a good double knot, adjust as required.

It won't be exact, because it would be hard to exactly match the amount of tension and looseness, and I haven't tried it, but I bet it's close enough.

Or does that sound too silly?

 

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Posted: 05-13-2010, 07:43 PM

 I have tried this with my DD's boot (couldn't work out why the laces in there were clearly too short - they would go nowhere near the top hooks). The aglets were gone so I knew that if I removed the lace to measure I'd never get them back in, but she had to wear the short laces until the longer ones were ordered in:

Take a large sewing needle/tapestry needle or similar, and about 4 metres of thick thread (it needs to be strong or it will break. Dental floss works in a pinch but is expensive). Since the average lace is about 120 inches (or 3.2 metres), starting with 4 metres of thread will ensure you have enough. You don't need to run it off the reel all at once - just make sure there's sufficient on the reel.

Literally sew a new thread "lace" into the holes, leaving the current lace intact. Leave plenty of thread at the beginning top end, so you can "trial lace" over all the hooks to make sure you have enough to cover the hooks too. Once you've finished, remove the thread and measure. If you've been careful, you can save the thread for use elsewhere (but not if it was dental floss!!) 

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Posted: 05-14-2010, 08:52 AM

 Quote:
Originally Posted by Query 
If you've got old laces... remove and measure them! Of course, if the ends are frayed, and they aren't nylon, you may never get them back in the boots. 
 
 
Use a lighter or superglue (depending on material of the lace) to harden the tips. 

Reserector
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Posted: 05-14-2010, 10:56 AM

 Regarding the cost of shipping laces compared to the cost of the laces themselves, try calling the reseller directly.

I have ordered small items like laces or dance plugs for my roller skates from online resellers many times. What I did was call their toll-free number and placed the order by phone and asked them to mail the item/s USPS. Shipping was only $3 ~ $5 that way.

It is not as convenient as ordering online, but I hate to buy something I really don't need just to justify the shipping. I also hate to do without a small item until I need a more costly one.