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Author Topic: Should I get new skates?  (Read 1073 times)

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Offline EnjoyTheGlide

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Should I get new skates?
« on: October 04, 2015, 10:21:16 PM »
Hey everyone!  I have a pair of Jackson Classiques in 6.5C that are approaching three years old now, are cosmetically in great shape (save for a scuff mark on one boot), and are broken in nicely.  Now, my concern with them is that I think they might be too big for me.  First off, I purchased removable arch supports for these boots because I believe I was curling my feet while skating to get a better "grip" in the boot, which resulted in a lot of arch pain after each session.  Secondly, my main gripe with them is that I only feel comfortable skating in them if I'm wearing thicker, "normal" socks as opposed to skating tights/knee-highs.  Those few millimeters that the thicker socks gives makes a huge difference in how secure I feel on the ice.

I'm bringing this up now because I first got them when I was still going through Basic Skills 1-8.  I figured that having a little wiggle room didn't really matter then, especially when I was only starting out.  Now that I'm wrapping up Freestyle 1 though, I'm beginning to have doubts about the shakiness I feel when doing more advanced, toe pick-heavy elements (mazurka, toe loop, etc.), and I know that more jumps will be coming up in Freestyles 2+.  Perhaps I am biased because I am an adult skater, but I am very concerned about breaking something if I fall, and I feel that that is a very real possibility if I don't feel secure in my skates. 

Reading this over again, I guess the answer is clear, though I can't help but feel hesitant, since after all, these skates still have a good deal of life left in them...  Even so, does all of this warrant a new pair of (better-fitting) skates?  Thanks in advance!

Offline riley876

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Re: Should I get new skates?
« Reply #1 on: October 04, 2015, 11:18:16 PM »
If nothing else, simply having a pair of backup skates is a practical idea.

Offline FigureSpins

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Re: Should I get new skates?
« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2015, 08:30:00 AM »
Try replacing the insoles and laces and see if that improves the fit. It's a cheap way to get more use out of skates.  A new insole will lift your foot up in the skate, making it fit more tightly and providing the needed support.  Laces wear out, break or just don't stay tight after a while.  Skates do stretch a bit as they break in, which makes them fit less snugly.  (Actually, I think it's that the padding compresses due to wear and tear.) 
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Offline AgnesNitt

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Offline nicklaszlo

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Re: Should I get new skates?
« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2015, 11:05:20 PM »
Your skates are too big.  This can cause injury even if you do not fall, particularly when jumping.  I would not expect Classiques to last three years - but it depends on how often you skate. 

Offline EnjoyTheGlide

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Re: Should I get new skates?
« Reply #5 on: October 11, 2015, 07:13:44 PM »
I think I'm going to try getting fitted for a new pair later this winter, though in the meantime I'll invest in some insoles.  Thanks for the feedback, everyone.

Offline EnjoyTheGlide

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Re: Should I get new skates?
« Reply #6 on: December 17, 2015, 12:08:59 PM »
I know my topic didn't get too much attention, but I figured that I should at least update in case this thread might be helpful to someone in the future.  I ended up being fitted for and getting a pair of Edea Chorus in size 245 (mm) and they fit better than the Jacksons did when I first got them.  My feet are about 230-235 mm in length, which is roughly 9.1-9.25 inches or so and according to the Jackson sizing charts on Kinzie's Closet and Figure Skating Store, it seems as though I should have gotten a size 5.5 or 6.0 pair of Jackson skates as opposed to size 6.5 back then.  While the the size 6.5 Jacksons fit me fine both on- and off-ice  while wearing skating tights when I first got them, I do agree with FigureSpins in that the padding just compresses and loses "bounce" over time.

Offline Query

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Re: Should I get new skates?
« Reply #7 on: December 17, 2015, 03:53:36 PM »
I respectfully disagree! With a little work, you can get a perfect fit.

As I've said elsewhere, I am using too-big boots (size 8, instead of size 6 - 6.5), by cutting new thick insoles out of carpet foam. I have carefully cut them to shape, and they go around my feet where I need them to as well as below them, and I did a heat mold, to create a very precise fit to my feet. Plus I wear thick cushy fleece socks (2 socks on the smaller foot), which act like a plush liner, and makes the fit  absolutely perfect. The result is much more comfortable, uniformly snug (except at the toes, which I like loose), and is a better fit than I've ever had before, even with custom boots - partly because my foot shape doesn't work with any stock boots, partly because my old custom fit was badly done.

My toes tend to be cold - the closed cell carpet foam and thick socks solves that completely. Use tape or maybe open cell foam instead of closed cell foam if you have warm sweaty feet instead of my cold feet.
 
I also sized my blades to my feet (i.e., the size that smaller boots would have used - they were sized to my old custom boots), not my boots, and carefully mounted the blade sweet spots under and slightly ahead of the balls of my foot, instead of flush with the front of the front mounting plate, which works very well.

I love the results.

One problem remains: They are heavier than smaller boots. However, you are closer in intended size, so weight may not be an issue.

(A second problem is that the boots are too stiff, but presumably that doesn't apply to you.)

At my web page (below) you will find instructions for modifying boots to fit. But basically, start with carpet foam, and cut to shape until everything is uniformly snug, then do a new heat mold.

If you hate thick socks, that is another matter. If your boots heat mold well, and you tie tight enough, you might manage without them. I like socks.

I don't know whether a snug fit is good enough to make socks not slip on high level jumps, because I barely jump. You may have to lace very tight.

However, if money is not an issue, then of course you should get new boots to make you happy, whether you need them or not. Retail therapy! :)

Offline riley876

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Re: Should I get new skates?
« Reply #8 on: December 17, 2015, 04:03:01 PM »
I've discovered cork floor tiles work nice too as thick insoles.   Hard enough to not be uncontrollably squishy, but still enough give to be kind to the feet.   And reasonable light.