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Author Topic: Pincer Nails  (Read 1109 times)

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Offline riley876

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Pincer Nails
« on: April 06, 2015, 11:36:17 PM »
My first pair of skates were half a size too small, and the repeated trauma caused me to lose both my big toe nails.  Since then they've grown back, but I've had continual trouble with ingrown nails, related infections, and finally developing into "pincer nails".

Not *really* bad yet, but am wondering what can be done, given the continual pressure from daily skating.  My current skates aren't tight around the toe, but skating does seem to be making things worse. 

Seeing a podiatrist is out of the question at this stage :(

Offline Query

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Re: Pincer Nails
« Reply #1 on: April 07, 2015, 07:43:41 PM »
I've never heard of "pincer nails" before, but I'll send you my link about using a ball and ring pliers, or a boot press, to stretch the toeboxes next to your toes. You can buy the former, and a good skate fitter, or probably a good ski shop, will have the latter. Depending on the boot, you may even be able to stretch it with a good heat mold.

Next time, consider buying or ordering a boot with a much wider toe.

Offline riley876

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Re: Pincer Nails
« Reply #2 on: April 08, 2015, 02:23:03 AM »
Cheers for the tips.

But my CURRENT skates are fine,  only my OLD skates were too tight (now retired).

I think my pincer nails ("google images" it if you're curious), is caused simply by the combination of the earlier total nail loss, combined with normal sideways pressures from skating causing it to grow back abnormally.    Possibly genetically susceptible too. 

I had a dig, and found out the usual fix is to grind/file the nail thin enough so it's flexible enough to lie flat.   So, I got out my rotary tool (i.e Dremmel clone) and did just that, and indeed, it has flattened out considerably.   Time will time if it stays that way.    I suspect I may have to do this regularly.

Offline rd350

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Re: Pincer Nails
« Reply #3 on: April 08, 2015, 10:33:38 AM »
Maybe a silicone toe cap would help protect you from (normal sideways) pressure?
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Offline AgnesNitt

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Re: Pincer Nails
« Reply #4 on: April 08, 2015, 03:09:02 PM »
My mother has nails like that. When I go home I have to clip them for her. Stay on top of them or you'll get ingrown toenails.
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Offline Query

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Re: Pincer Nails
« Reply #5 on: April 08, 2015, 03:33:14 PM »
I'm glad your newer boots fit you better! The desirability of well fit skates seems to be something that a lot of people learn from experience.

Personally I don't want the sides of the boot to touch any part of the ends of my toes at all, except the bottoms of my toes... But that may be an over-reaction to too tight a fit next to my big and little toes on my last boots.

I don't know exactly why, but some athletic trainers' books say that to avoid "ingrown toenails" (admittedly a little different, because the nails cut into the skin), toenails should be cut straight across instead of in a curve. I wonder if that would help.

It's scary to play with medical things without the advice of a medical expert. Hope all goes well.

Offline riley876

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Re: Pincer Nails
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2015, 04:41:00 PM »
I don't know exactly why, but some athletic trainers' books say that to avoid "ingrown toenails" (admittedly a little different, because the nails cut into the skin), toenails should be cut straight across instead of in a curve. I wonder if that would help.

I have heard this before, and am following that on the better side.  It does seem to stop the ingrownness, since the sharp corners are past the point of digging into anything, but it hasn't stopped the excessive curl that's the root of the issue.

On the worst side it's a little beyond that sort of help.  Currently it is cut right back to about halfway in order to properly drain a minor infection in the nail bed.   Hopefully now that the nail has been thinned out, it'll grow back flat enough to not get ingrown again.

Quote
It's scary to play with medical things without the advice of a medical expert. Hope all goes well.

Cheers for the well wishes.

Never had much faith in the medical profession anyway.  And certainly not afraid of turning a scapel (or dremmel!) on myself when needed.  I'm not squeemish.