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Author Topic: Ice Halo  (Read 1261 times)

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Offline beginner skater

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Ice Halo
« on: January 08, 2016, 06:25:05 AM »
The Ice Halo is now available in the UK. Can anyone tell me if they feel the Ice Halo HD seems more or less protective than the ordinary Ice Halo? I did ask the manufacturer's a while back, but no response. Should I get an Ice Halo, or think about braving t out with a helmet. Also anyone know if a ski-ing helmet would be appropriate? Thanks for any advice/opinion/info  :)

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Re: Ice Halo
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2016, 08:55:52 AM »
I know they both meet some Canadian hockey helmet standards, but I don't know whether one or the other is better above and beyond that. I tried the regular Ice Halo in a shop once and didn't like how bulky it was. I've got the HD and like it a lot. Haven't actually tested it out by hitting my head, though!

Offline riley876

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Re: Ice Halo
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2016, 01:38:51 PM »
No commercially available helmets are great.   In particular the foam in them tends to be way too hard for the average skating fall (if the foam doesn't compress during an impact it may as well be concrete).   Officially, probably the most appropriate type of helmet is for "trick rolling skating" (ASTM F1492).   But in practice ski helmets are as good as any other.    Which is to say, almost certainly better than nothing.

The Halos might actually be safer in practice, due to their foam being softer and more compressible (i.e. more appropriate to low speed falls).   Though again if it's too soft for a given impact, it may as well not be there either.

It's a sad state of affairs.

Offline icedancer

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Re: Ice Halo
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2016, 03:26:24 PM »
I've seen those ice halos fly right off when a skater landed on their butt.

skategeek - I like the one you were wearing the other day!

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Re: Ice Halo
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2016, 03:50:23 PM »
Riley 876, the most discreet ice halo is described as high density, from what I recall of your foam experiments higher density is best. It is thinner than the normal one and the UK supplier is telling me that just because it is higher density it is going to be more protective than the foam in the other one. Does that make sense according to the laws of physics? I was kind of thinking that the level of protection would depend on thickness too, so in their effort to make the halo more visually acceptable, it is possible that they have compromised on protection?

Skategeek, is the HD machine washable? I agree it looks much better than the fleece ice halo. Did you see the fur ones? I'mwondering if they look like a normal fur headband in real life, or whether the shape of the ice halo underneath is all too apparent? In theory I quite fancy the Russian/filmstar look, although not sure I would wear it when it came to the crunch. Was that what you were wearing which was admired by ice dancer? Is it possible to adjust it so it is comfortable, but doesnt slip off too easily?

I guess I wouldnt mind it falling off when I landed on my skate safe padded butt. As long as it didnt fall off when I was falling onto my head..

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Re: Ice Halo
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2016, 07:17:17 PM »
I've seen those ice halos fly right off when a skater landed on their butt.

skategeek - I like the one you were wearing the other day!

Riley 876, the most discreet ice halo is described as high density, from what I recall of your foam experiments higher density is best. It is thinner than the normal one and the UK supplier is telling me that just because it is higher density it is going to be more protective than the foam in the other one. Does that make sense according to the laws of physics? I was kind of thinking that the level of protection would depend on thickness too, so in their effort to make the halo more visually acceptable, it is possible that they have compromised on protection?

Skategeek, is the HD machine washable? I agree it looks much better than the fleece ice halo. Did you see the fur ones? I'mwondering if they look like a normal fur headband in real life, or whether the shape of the ice halo underneath is all too apparent? In theory I quite fancy the Russian/filmstar look, although not sure I would wear it when it came to the crunch. Was that what you were wearing which was admired by ice dancer? Is it possible to adjust it so it is comfortable, but doesnt slip off too easily?

I guess I wouldnt mind it falling off when I landed on my skate safe padded butt. As long as it didnt fall off when I was falling onto my head..

Yep, mine is the Ice Halo HD.  The medium fits me pretty snugly (the slight fold in the fabric at the front leaves a crease in my forehead by the end of the session, but it isn't uncomfortable).  Having said that, though, I have no doubt that an impact at the wrong angle could send it right off.  (RibCaps have a chin strap to prevent that problem.)  In terms of aesthetics, I've had several people not realize that it was actual head protection until I showed them. 

The cover is supposed to be removable and washable (95% cotton/5% spandex).  I haven't tried it myself yet. 

Offline Live2Sk8

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Re: Ice Halo
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2016, 07:28:19 PM »
I have the fake bunny fur Ice Halo (original, not HD).  Most people just think I am wearing a huge furry headband to keep warm, and I get compliments on it.  It is very pretty and soft.  I believe it is surface washable only.  I wear mine tight enough that I have to release pressure a few times while I am skating, otherwise I get a headache (that goes away when I take the Ice Halo off).  I have not hit my head while wearing it.  It is thick, but you only have one brain.  If people think I am weird for wearing it, well that is their problem.

Offline riley876

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Re: Ice Halo
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2016, 11:26:31 PM »
For a helmet you can certainly have foam that's too dense.    Body pads are different, because body weight is so much more than head weight, and you don't need to reduce impact G's so much as just distribute the impact over the largest area.

My woefully rubbish Pryme V2 helmet for instance had foam I couldn't compress even by jumping and down on it, on one foot.   1m drop test didn't touch it either.  :o

And you can certainly have foam that's too soft.  If it bottoms out during a hit, it may as well not be there.

The best density depends on two things:
- The thickness of the foam
- The expected speed (i.e. height) of the impact

There is no universally best density, but just one that is most suitable for the particular impact in question.  But if you have to pick, pick the thicker protection.   Doubling the thickness halves the required density of foam, and therefore halves the impact force.

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Re: Ice Halo
« Reply #8 on: January 09, 2016, 08:57:45 AM »
I have no experience with the Ice Halo’s, so I have no comments on them.  As for helmets, here are my thoughts:

(1) You’ll often hear, “Any helmet is better than no helmet!”  To some extent true.  But a couple of major caveats. 

(a) If the helmet is ineffective, but wearing the helmet gives you a false sense of security and causes you to be reckless, then the helmet does more harm than good. 

(b) I would steer clear of the aerodynamic bike helmets, which, unfortunately, seem to be popular with young kids.  I’m talking about the ones with extended, pointed ends at the front and the back.  Why anyone would design a helmet that concentrates impact force over a small area and that causes high torque on the neck during impact really beats me.

(2) As riley876 mentioned, no single density foam is ideal for all impacts.  That’s why better grade helmets have multiple layers of protection; for example, a hard external shell, an intermediate layer of dense foam, plastic honeycomb, or plastic springs, and an inner liner of soft foam.  Some helmets are designed for a single-use, high-impact collision.  Other helmets are designed for multiple-use, lower impact collisions. 

(3) A helmet must be comfortable; otherwise, it will end up in the junk pile.  Comfort depends on several factors, including (a) fit , (b) weight and balance, and (c) ventilation. 

(a) If the fit isn’t proper, not only will it be a constant source of irritation, but it might not stay on properly during a crash.  Cheaper helmets are “one size fits all” in which you stick on blocks of foam to adjust the fit.  Better helmets come in a variety of sizes.  The best ones also have an adjustable ratchet headband.  For me, a ratchet headband is essential, because I wear glasses.  I loosen the headband so I can slip the helmet on without knocking off my glasses.  I then tighten the headband.  Similarly, before I remove the helmet, I first loosen the headband, so I can slip off the helmet without knocking off my glasses.  The combination of an adjustable headband and an adjustable chinstrap gives me great confidence that the helmet will stay in place during a fall.  It’s important to go to a store with a good selection and try several on before you buy.

(b) For figure skating, you need a lightweight, well-balanced helmet, especially if you do spins.  Cheaper helmets tend to use a solid geometry with heavyweight materials.  Better helmets are sculpted to reduce weight, and use lighter weight materials. 

(c) You work up a sweat during figure skating, so it’s important that the helmet be well ventilated.  Cheaper helmets have solid shells and liners.  Better helmets have sculpted shells with flow channels and vent slots, along with vented liners.

(4) If you take lessons, you need to be able to hear the coach.  Make sure there are are sound vents over the ears.

(5) If you are considering helmets, take a look at (a) hockey helmets and (b) “snow sports” helmets, including “snow boarding” helmets.  My coach thought that hockey helmets would be too bulky and heavy.  She suggested I consider snow sports helmets, which several adult skaters at my rink use.  I tried on a couple, but they just didn’t fit properly (not right for my head shape).  I ended up with an intermediate-grade hockey helmet that had all the features I needed (as discussed above).  I’d be interested in peoples’ experiences with ski helmets, which the OP brought up.

(6) Caveats.

(a) Virginia Tech released a study of hockey helmets (HECC certified) last year.  Their emphasis was on effectiveness for reducing concussions during high impacts.  Their disturbing conclusion was that most hockey helmets, including pro-grade ones, don’t do a good job for protection against concussions.   (A Bauer rep said that the current emphasis is on protection against skull fractures.)  That said, I don’t plan on taking a header into the boards or butting heads with another player, and I don’t plan to be at the receiving end of a high-speed puck.  I have had a few minor falls, and my helmet has provided adequate protection. 

(b) Hockey helmets without a face cage and snow sports helmets will not provide protection against a face plant.  That is, you can bust up your nose, cheek, and chin. 

(c) I personally would not wear any protective device that is likely to pop off during use.  I once fell on my butt during a spin.  A pad protected my tailbone.  But, after the butt plant, my upper body swung backwards, and I hit the back of my head on the ice.  My helmet stayed on and I was fine.  If I had been wearing a head protector that popped off during the butt plant, I would likely have creamed the back of my head.



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Re: Ice Halo
« Reply #9 on: January 09, 2016, 09:06:48 AM »
Delete.  Duplicate by mistake.

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Re: Ice Halo
« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2016, 02:51:55 PM »
Delete.

Offline beginner skater

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Re: Ice Halo
« Reply #11 on: January 12, 2016, 10:22:56 AM »
Thanks for all the comprehensive replies. I heard back from Ice Halo, and they say the Ice Halo HD provides slightly more protection than the Ice Halo. So I guess I would go for that if I decide to take a small step to head protection. Which I probably should, since I have my elbows, wrists, knees and sacrum covered    ;D