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21
The Pro Shop / Re: Best boots for Axel and Doubles? Edea vs Jackson?
« Last post by nicklaszlo on October 14, 2017, 12:05:54 AM »
Do any skates last 5 years? I skate around 7-10 hours a week, but I'm only doing singles, not triples!

No, you should expect to get new skates every 1-2 years. 

I only do singles and I recently wore out boots that were "for triple jumps" in just six months.   But I am a bit heavier than you and my stroking is quite forceful. 
22
The Pro Shop / Re: Best boots for Axel and Doubles? Edea vs Jackson?
« Last post by Arwen17 on October 13, 2017, 06:41:34 PM »
UPDATE (10/13): 
Here's what I learned after cornering a few of the girls who do wear Edea at my rink. 
They said there was an adjustment period, but it wasn't that bad. They said it does feel loose in the ankle, but that's the way it supposed to be and you eventually get used to it. 
My coach said that Jackson redesigned their boots with a higher heel etc to be more like the Edea skates so since my Jackson boots are from 12 years ago, I'll still have to get used to the new version of Jackson anyway. So she said if I want Edea, and it doesn't feel bad when I try them on, there's no reason to stay with Jackson since I'll have to adjust anyway.   
My coach is going to try to find out if the Edea and Jackson reps will be at regionals in Nashville because that's a much shorter drive for me and that would allow me to get fitted by a "pro".   
She also knows someone who can put the boot and blade together for me once I make up my mind! Yay!!!!   
She thinks I should just go for the Edea Chorus if I decide on Edea. And the other girls who already wear Edea IceFly/Piano said the boots don't last any longer than any other skate, even if the skate is above your level like Ice Fly, Piano, etc. AKA there's no reason to buy skates that expensive until your skating level requires it. Seems like they think Chorus is for beginning doubles and Ice Fly or Piano for later doubles like flip, lutz, axel since no one at my rink does triples.
23
The Pro Shop / Re: Blade care vs rust
« Last post by Ethereal Ice on October 13, 2017, 12:28:25 PM »
Dry, store without soakers, get NO rust**

**-more to it than this

So, I take care of two sets of blades, mine and DH's. Both are Coronation Dance. Procedure is, after skating we dry our blades and boots carefully and put on a big, thick soaker that covers the whole bottom of the boot/sole. When we get home I remove the big soakers, check the blades for nicks, and apply a dry, plain, blade-only soaker. I flip our big soakers inside-out to dry. I store our skates open to air all the time (this does have it's drawbacks, my hubby found a small spider in his boot yesterday-oops!!). Additionally, if I know we are not going to skate for a few days, I put a light coating of mineral oil on the blades before I apply the dry soakers. Our dry soakers are the type that has stiff nylon that is actually along the blade bottom, and I think they allow more air to reach the blade rather than having the terrycloth there, just a guess on my part.

My system works nicely, not only to keep the blades in good shape but also the soles stay nice and dry. I cannot stand to see skates with rotted soles...recently when I took my old skates in to have my blades switched to my new boots, the tech said, "Those soles are beautiful! You must take great care of them." I beamed with pride and my husband was cracking up. I enjoy caring for our skates and do actually take some pride in the fact that they are in great shape, smell good, etc. I know that people joke about neglecting their skates, but the reality is that it is not just aesthetic,  it is a safety issue to have boots and/or blades in bad shape.
24
The Pro Shop / Re: Blade care vs rust
« Last post by amy1984 on October 13, 2017, 08:50:40 AM »
I'm terrible at taking care of my blades.  I'll admit it.  I sort of knock the snow off, give them a half hearted swipe with a towel, and put soakers on.  They're... mostly dry??  Somehow, I don't have issues with rust.  I don't store them in the car ever.  Even if I take them to work I take them inside.  The temperature varies greatly where I live.  I think it'd mess with the heat molding to leave them in the car.
25
The Pro Shop / Re: Best boots for Axel and Doubles? Edea vs Jackson?
« Last post by amy1984 on October 13, 2017, 08:43:04 AM »
Are you in North America?  If so, Jackson will be noticeably more cost effective, especially if you go with Ultima blades.  I used to skate in Risport and I saved at least a couple hundred dollars by switching to Jackson with Ultima blades.  The cost of the blade is a huge part of it.  For some people, the fit of edea is great enough to be worth the cost.  But for me, I just can't justify the cost when Jackson fits me well and I'm happy with them. 

Also the breakdown is noticeable.  Many people really like Edea - they find them comfortable, etc.  But the one complaint that is consistent out in my area is that they feel less supportive and they break down quicker.  So you'll spend that money to buy again rather quickly.  Now, for some people, the boot works well enough for them that this is worth it.  You'll just have to decide if it's worth it for you.  If you're in an area where you don't have a skating shop and would need to make a special trip for new skates, that might be something else to consider.
26
The Pro Shop / Re: Re: Avanta Contact Info
« Last post by tothepointe on October 13, 2017, 01:01:30 AM »
When will companies learn that keeping contact information constant (web pages, etc.) is a really good idea? Doing anything else makes it look like you are hiding from your customers, which for a company with good people like Avanta makes no sense. It is bad enough that they didn't manage to retain the Klingbeil name, even though they took a lot of people on from Klingbeil when that company died, and they used Don Klingbeil as an advisor.

I do notice that Avanta and RockerZ are associated through the Sineks, so perhaps it wasn't a mixup at all.

Back to a recent question, though not the originally topic from 2014, the Facebook page and the OLD Instagram page both have lots of pictures of Avanta boots. The hook pattern makes them look a lot like Klingbeil's boots - which makes a lot of sense.

For some reason, I haven't met anyone using Avanta boots, though a lot of people here loved Klingbeil boots, and the good service they offered. Are Avanta boots popular anywhere - e.g., near Avanta's own location?

I had sort of decided I might buy Avantas if I needed new boots, but there is no one here to ask about them.

I would love to hear if recent Avanta boot purchases have lived up to their promise, and how recent Avantas compare to other boots in quality, weight and durability. The new website isn't very specific yet, other than that they are using leather uppers, which seems different from the emphasis on new materials Avanta talked about in the early days. How good is the custom fit? Is the factory fit still done by a podiatrist? How well does the original post in this thread still apply? A really good informative, website, with exactly what they offer, at what prices, would be an excellent way to attract new customers.

They don't seem to mention the rockerz soles at all anymore so maybe it's not a mixup and some kind of disagreement. There seems to be no reason at all to change all of your social media accounts, email servers and website. I don't know anyone who skates in them and I was surprised they had no dealers in the Los Angeles area though I was willing to travel to San Fran for the day.
27
The Pro Shop / Re: Re: Avanta Contact Info
« Last post by Ethereal Ice on October 13, 2017, 12:40:39 AM »
Hey Query I have some info for you, I need to send it via private message but your inbox is full, you must be pretty popular! If you open it up I will send you the message.
28
The Pro Shop / Re: Ankle protection? Help!
« Last post by Loops on October 12, 2017, 10:44:40 PM »
Silipos gel sleeves.

Worth every penny.
29
The Pro Shop / Re: Re: Avanta Contact Info
« Last post by Query on October 12, 2017, 02:44:05 PM »
When will companies learn that keeping contact information constant (web pages, etc.) is a really good idea? Doing anything else makes it look like you are hiding from your customers, which for a company with good people like Avanta makes no sense. It is bad enough that they didn't manage to retain the Klingbeil name, even though they took a lot of people on from Klingbeil when that company died, and they used Don Klingbeil as an advisor.

I do notice that Avanta and RockerZ are associated through the Sineks, so perhaps it wasn't a mixup at all.

Back to a recent question, though not the originally topic from 2014, the Facebook page and the OLD Instagram page both have lots of pictures of Avanta boots. The hook pattern makes them look a lot like Klingbeil's boots - which makes a lot of sense.

For some reason, I haven't met anyone using Avanta boots, though a lot of people here loved Klingbeil boots, and the good service they offered. Are Avanta boots popular anywhere - e.g., near Avanta's own location?

I had sort of decided I might buy Avantas if I needed new boots, but there is no one here to ask about them.

I would love to hear if recent Avanta boot purchases have lived up to their promise, and how recent Avantas compare to other boots in quality, weight and durability. The new website isn't very specific yet, other than that they are using leather uppers, which seems different from the emphasis on new materials Avanta talked about in the early days. How good is the custom fit? Is the factory fit still done by a podiatrist? How well does the original post in this thread still apply? A really good informative, website, with exactly what they offer, at what prices, would be an excellent way to attract new customers.

30
The Pro Shop / Re: Ankle protection? Help!
« Last post by Query on October 12, 2017, 01:32:11 PM »
One possibility is that they don't yet completely fit the shape of your feet and lower leg. In particular, if the boot fits loosely against some parts of your feet and lower leg, and tightly against others, it may slip and rub against the loose places, creating blisters, which can sometimes make you bleed, and press very hard against the tight places, creating other problems. If you can even out the pressure, and no longer need as much pressure to try to make the boot conform to your feet, the problem might disappear. (If blisters are the only problem, tightening your laces as much as you can may fix it. But if one problem is an excessively high pressure point, that would make it worse.)

For example, at one point I had a pair of boots that fit very tight against my ankle bones, and my big a little toes, and barely touched anywhere else on the sides of my feet and lower leg. They hurt a lot. The bottom of my feet, due to a slant-mismatch, only created pressure on one side of the foot - fixed by re-shaping the insole - but that isn't your problem. But the incompetent fitter (they were full custom boots that would have fit perfectly if he had done his job right) claimed they fit, so I had to find my own answers over a period of years. (He didn't tell me that the custom boot maker, like most custom boot makers, would have freely fixed the misfit, as mentioned below.)

If this is the case, the first thing you should have done, if possible, is a heat mold, which many shops can do. If that doesn't do the job, pad the loose places by sticking an adhesive foam like moleskin onto the inner surface of the boot, and press out the tight places with a boot press (which many good pro shops have - they do the work). The moleskin may eventually rub off, so keep a little extra with you.

I don't have a boot press. A good fitter more or less fixed it, but the stretch was big enough that it didn't last. So I bought a cheaper (but slower) cast iron boot stretching tool, a ball-and-ring pliers (also called hoke-and-ball pliers, or bunion stretching pliers; which some of us have bought for ourselves) that looks like one of these:

  http://www.ebay.com/itm/FootFitter-Ball-Ring-Cast-Iron-Bunion-Stretcher-Targets-Pressure-Points-/162636613571?epid=16004776150&hash=item25dde5c7c3:g:g8QAAOSwl~tZlxdu

  http://www.ebay.com/itm/Mens-Podiatrist-HOKE-BALL-BUNION-Spot-Shoe-Stretcher-Free-Liquid-/112218488640?hash=item1a20be3f40:g:GYEAAOSwa-dWjr9w

There are slightly cheaper ones that don't have a set screw, so you need to use another tool to keep it closed - probably not worth the bother:

  http://www.ebay.com/itm/Vtg-Shoe-Cobbler-Bunion-Reliever-Ball-Ring-Shoe-Stretcher-by-Giant-Tool-Co-/282670471396?hash=item41d07918e4:g:CtUAAOSwI7tZyqIS (same issue)

If the boot gradually unstretches over time, as mine did, you may need to redo the stretch. (If you aren't strong enough, you may need help to clamp it tight.) It helps to apply alcohol to the inside leather to be stretched, if it isn't covered with padding, and heat it up with a hand-held hair drier. If it is a big stretch, do it over a day or so, and keep re-tightening the pliers. Don't use the set screw to tighten - it probably isn't strong enough - just to hold it in place once tightened.

There are also wooden bunion stretchers, that are cheaper, but I'm not sure they are strong enough, or are capable of reaching far enough inside the boot to help. The cast-iron pliers I showed here could probably even all reach all the way down to the toe area, if you unlace the boot first and insert them near the bottom of the tongue. They are fun toys to play with.

The Bunga pads, or equivalent might relieve the loose areas. Whether they can relieve the tight areas will depend on how much space is available inside the boot. But a lot of people do use them, and are very happy with them.

There is another fast answer, if there is enough room inside your boot. Wear thick squish-able socks, like the fleece socks they sell in camping and ski stores. Some people, think that provides too little control over the boot, but at least for me, it has sometimes worked. You COULD also wear multiple pairs of thinner socks - but that allows a lot of slippage, and consequent loss of control over the boot. In the end I preferred reshaping the boots, but thick socks were a quick answer to boots that were also a bit over-size.

Personally, I like boots that are well padded, like the upper end Jackson boots often are, and have a "rolled cuff" at the top. That reduces the affects of ill fit a lot, though I know some skaters like the feel and control that bare leather provide. But you have the boots you have, so if the Bunga pads or thick socks don't satisfy, it is worth trying a reshape.

A GOOD skate tech at a pro shop will often fix all these problems on new boots for free if you ordered the boots through him or her - so, ask. If the first person you talk to doesn't say yes, ask to talk to the store manager, who is often better at his or her job than some of the workers.

In the end, if you can't get things right, or if you happen to live near the factory, call the boot maker, and ask what to do. If they were custom boots, the fix may be free, if you can get to the factory, or to a good authorized fitter. Even if they aren't custom, they can do it for a fee. If they were full custom, but were grossly misfit, they may make you new boots at no added cost.

Incidentally, a podiatrist or a suitably trained sports-PT might be able to help - at a cost. At least a dozen of the aforementioned incompetent fitter's customers went to the same podiatrist for similar problems. I might have too, if I had known such people existed, before I spent years figuring out ways to handle it. It is best to find a sports-podiatrist who specializes in skating or skiing customers. (Alpine skiers also use edges, and also frequently use very tight, stiff boots. Many ski shops also have boot presses or ball-and-ring-pliers, as do a few other high end shoe and boot shops, and some shoe and boot repair places.)

If fit IS the issue, stay far away from the pro-shop that ordered and adjusted your boots. They will likely mess everything else up, like sharpening. E.g., I've been told by the employees of one pro shop that mostly handles hockey that they take about 1 - 3 mm of steel off the blades every time they sharpen, to get out the big nicks that often develop in hockey blades - over an order of magnitude more than the 0.003" (.0762 mm) that is frequently advocated for figure skates. So blades sharpened by those standards will last through 1 - 2 orders of magnitude fewer sharpenings than at a first class figure skate pro shop. People on this board have told other horror stories of what bad pro shops do, like reshaping the blades to be like hockey blades. Bad pro shops just aren't worth it.
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