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91
Off-Ice Training for Skaters / Update on my hernia: Post-op
« Last post by Query on November 09, 2017, 09:21:52 PM »
8 Days ago I had the hernia repair surgery. It was an out patient operation - I went home afterwards.

The hardest part to deal with was that they wouldn't let me drive myself home, nor take public transportation. Some sort of weird hospital rule concerning anaesthesia. By the time my ride came, it was 8 or 9 hours later (because I wanted an operation as soon as possible, and didn't schedule wisely, according to when I could get someone to drive me), and I would probably have been in good enough shape for driving and/or public transportation - though I had to avoid much walking.

The surgeon removed the dressing over the incision today. He said everything looked good. E.g., no signs of infection. Just a scar. He said I can go back to normal activity and training as soon as the pain goes away, and expects that to take about a week.

I stay away from unnecessary drugs as much as I can, but anesthetics during surgery are a necessity - it makes it much easier for the surgeon to operate, and it relaxes the muscles, which makes the operation go better too.

They gave me pain killers (including narcotics) during surgery, and used anesthetics to put me to sleep. Narcotics have side affects - it took 3 days before I could "poo". (The surgeon said it sometimes takes 7 days.) I was also prescribed pain killers to take after surgery, but chose not to. I want to know if I am damaging something, so I avoid pain killers whenever I can. I asked them not to use Versed (generic name Midazolam) - which tends to make you forgetful, because I had trouble remembering things after an operation I had about 20 years ago, during which they may have used it.

I can also go back to normal bathing.  (Between the operation and today, I was supposed to take very gentle showers, with no scrubbing, and only pat dry, and avoid swimming or getting in a hot tub, presumably to avoid weakening the skin, or making the dressing come off.)

However, my own idea, I will cover the scar with (paper) first aid tape, so I don't scratch it. I have found that to be a reasonably good way to prevent myself from scratching places that itch. (Cloth first aid tape is too sticky, and damages what it covers. Paper first aid tape sticks slightly better than a Band Aid. My entire first aid kit now consists of a roll of paper first aid tape. :) )

Hernias occur when part of the digestive tract breaks through a weak part of the abdominal wall (mostly muscle) that holds things in place.

The physical trainer at the gym/pool I joined said that I should have worked on cardio (aerobic) endurance and abs strengthening, before doing any other strength training. The surgeon agreed - although he says that in practice he has noticed no obvious correlation between weight lifting and hernias. Hernias are one of the most common surgeries - almost 1/3 of men get them, and a few women too. So this advice may be something that many people who aren't in great physical shape should follow, if they want to get stronger.

I may take at least one lesson from that trainer, even though he is expensive. He at least seems to know what he is talking about.

All and all, things are looking up.

I wasn't supposed to skate last weekend, but had to for work. I was extremely careful, skating slowly, on two feet, using as little muscle as practical. But I admit that I still used some abdominal stabilizing muscles to stay upright. (If you use no muscles at all, you can't stand up, on ice or on dry land.) I will have to skate a little this weekend too, but will again do as little as possible, this week.

:)
92
The Pro Shop / Re: Are the blades set correctly?
« Last post by ocug on November 09, 2017, 09:21:31 PM »


AFAICT, the toe left-right placement is about right, but the heel placement is wrong, unless she needed that correction.

i really dont think she needs any corrections ;) Her coach doesnt think so, and the expert didnt tell me he put it on the edge to make any corrections either ... :(

But none of us have seen your daughter skate, on centered blades or otherwise. We don't know what the fitter saw that made him do what he did.

i dont think he saw her skate on her last skates ever before either.. if you do want to watch her skates she has a fb page with her name jessi jurka... i really cant tell the difference :(

One result of the shown blade placement is that she would also need to change the direction in which she orients her right foot. If she doesn't need that particular correction, that is a lot to ask of the young lady. In particular, to skate symmetrically, she will need to rotate her right foot clockwise (so the toe moves outwards, and the heel inwards), to go in the same direction as before. Unless she has an asymmetric anatomy, in which the foot orientation and knee/hip orientation do not match (which she might - one of the reasons to talk to the fitter), that may look slightly strange. Figure skating is an appearance sport, and for the most part, I don't think you want a pathological look if you can avoid it. So if her body lines up without a twist in her right leg, I don't think this is the right thing to do.

maybe thats why she got her first blister on her right foot?? she said she felt a lot of pressure and it hurt a lot while she was skating.. I thought it was maybe just the new boots? her left foot is fine though ;)

There is some disagreement about what part of the blade people should skate on. I was taught, by a particular Russian ice dancer, and by his students, to lean my body and boots forwards when skating forwards, and back when skating back. I think that produces a very nice looking posture, in which the lean, blade position, etc., all line up and look similar to what many people use in international style ballroom dance, if I understand correctly (I'm not expert). (Ice dance style seems to me to be a lot more about getting a certain look than about practical ergonomic concerns.) But it is far more common, especially among freestyle skaters, to do the reverse - to lean forwards when skating back, and back when skating forwards, and there are some ways in which that is more practical mechanically. If she has been taught the more common lean pattern, the inside right blade mount will only affect her right forward outside edge, and will not affect the right back outside edge much. It should not affect her left edges at all, though she might be a little awkward switching from foot to foot until she gets used to the aforementioned clockwise rotation she will need in the right foot.

Assuming the common lean patter, with the blade to the inside, it should be easier to reach the FORWARD RIGHT outside edge, but also easier to fall over that edge, so she may be hesitant to use her forward right outside edge, especially at first. If the goal was to force her to use her right BACK outside edge more, mounting the blades to the inside only on the right heel doesn't make much sense to me. However, maybe the fitter judged that she was avoiding her right forward outside edge, and he wanted her to correct that.

I don't suppose the coach could talk to the fitter, and determine if he had a reason for doing what he did?

i wish he would.. hes russian and doesnt speak lots of english and avoids talking on the phone with anyone :( the specialist is more than an hour away from where we live so not  a chance of having them meet either :(



If it was me, unless there was a good reason to do otherwise, I would switch to a more normally centered blade placement. I used to mount both of my blades offset far to the left (though I did it both in the heel and toe), because that helped me balance, probably the result of tilted foot bottoms, which were in turn probably the result of somewhat unequal leg length - at least so I think. But that offset made it harder to spin centered, which I have trouble with in any event. So I moved the blades to the centers, and altered the shape of the insoles instead, to better support the left side of my feet. I still have trouble spinning, but centering the blade placement helped a little.

But everyone is different.

PS. I know my explanations tend to be a bit long-winded and hard to follow. That's because I feel such issues to be fairly complicated and unique to the individual. Making a simple explanation doesn't recognize that everybody's body is different. Maybe there is a good reason for what the fitter did.
[/quote]


thank you for all your information.. :)
93
The Pro Shop / Re: Are the blades set correctly?
« Last post by tstop4me on November 09, 2017, 09:08:07 PM »
i hope this pictures give a better view ;)
How about similar shots of the the other (left) boot?
94
The Pro Shop / Re: Are the blades set correctly?
« Last post by Query on November 09, 2017, 07:43:44 PM »
In case anyone gets confused - let me remind everyone that putting the skates upside down means that in the first image, the boot on the left is the right boot, and the boot on the right is the left boot. :blush:

AFAICT, the toe left-right placement is about right, but the heel placement is wrong, unless she needed that correction.

But none of us have seen your daughter skate, on centered blades or otherwise. We don't know what the fitter saw that made him do what he did.

One result of the shown blade placement is that she would also need to change the direction in which she orients her right foot. If she doesn't need that particular correction, that is a lot to ask of the young lady. In particular, to skate symmetrically, she will need to rotate her right foot clockwise (so the toe moves outwards, and the heel inwards), to go in the same direction as before. Unless she has an asymmetric anatomy, in which the foot orientation and knee/hip orientation do not match (which she might - one of the reasons to talk to the fitter), that may look slightly strange. Figure skating is an appearance sport, and for the most part, I don't think you want a pathological look if you can avoid it. So if her body lines up without a twist in her right leg, I don't think this is the right thing to do.

There is some disagreement about what part of the blade people should skate on. I was taught, by a particular Russian ice dancer, and by his students, to lean my body and boots forwards when skating forwards, and back when skating back. I think that produces a very nice looking posture, in which the lean, blade position, etc., all line up and look similar to what many people use in international style ballroom dance, if I understand correctly (I'm not expert). (Ice dance style seems to me to be a lot more about getting a certain look than about practical ergonomic concerns.) But it is far more common, especially among freestyle skaters, to do the reverse - to lean forwards when skating back, and back when skating forwards, and there are some ways in which that is more practical mechanically. If she has been taught the more common lean pattern, the inside right blade mount will only affect her right forward outside edge, and will not affect the right back outside edge much. It should not affect her left edges at all, though she might be a little awkward switching from foot to foot until she gets used to the aforementioned clockwise rotation she will need in the right foot.

Assuming the common lean patter, with the blade to the inside, it should be easier to reach the FORWARD RIGHT outside edge, but also easier to fall over that edge, so she may be hesitant to use her forward right outside edge, especially at first. If the goal was to force her to use her right BACK outside edge more, mounting the blades to the inside only on the right heel doesn't make much sense to me. However, maybe the fitter judged that she was avoiding her right forward outside edge, and he wanted her to correct that.

I don't suppose the coach could talk to the fitter, and determine if he had a reason for doing what he did?

If it was me, unless there was a good reason to do otherwise, I would switch to a more normally centered blade placement. I used to mount both of my blades offset far to the left (though I did it both in the heel and toe), because that helped me balance, probably the result of tilted foot bottoms, which were in turn probably the result of somewhat unequal leg length - at least so I think. But that offset made it harder to spin centered, which I have trouble with in any event. So I moved the blades to the centers, and altered the shape of the insoles instead, to better support the left side of my feet. I still have trouble spinning, but centering the blade placement helped a little.

But everyone is different.

PS. I know my explanations tend to be a bit long-winded and hard to follow. That's because I feel such issues to be fairly complicated and unique to the individual. Making a simple explanation doesn't recognize that everybody's body is different. Maybe there is a good reason for what the fitter did.

95
The Pro Shop / Re: Are the blades set correctly?
« Last post by ocug on November 09, 2017, 05:28:17 PM »
i hope this pictures give a better view ;)
96
The Pro Shop / Re: Are the blades set correctly?
« Last post by ocug on November 09, 2017, 04:19:01 PM »
Will take more pictures as soon as I get home ;) really appreciate it :)
97
The Pro Shop / Re: Are the blades set correctly?
« Last post by tstop4me on November 09, 2017, 04:17:00 PM »
Could you reshoot the photo with the camera lens viewing head-on the blades (the blades are a bit tilted in the current photo) so I can see the alignment better?  There are peculiarities with both skates, but I'm not sure it's an artifact of the photo.
98
The Pro Shop / Re: Are the blades set correctly?
« Last post by ocug on November 09, 2017, 04:09:54 PM »
He did but my daughter’s feedback is not great... she was just excited to get new boots... today in her private lesson is where she started having problems. Coach said she could get used to skate with the blade like that but when she switches to a normal blade set she will have trouble :(
I will take it to another specialist tomorrow and see what they say... every specialist is almost 2 hours away from where we live... thank you for your help
99
The Pro Shop / Re: Are the blades set correctly?
« Last post by tstop4me on November 09, 2017, 04:07:17 PM »
Did you buy the boot and blade from the tech, or did you buy online?  Typically, if you buy from the tech, the mounting and a first sharpening is included.  If you bought elsewhere, typically there is a charge ($60 for the mounting is about the going rate in my area).
100
The Pro Shop / Re: Are the blades set correctly?
« Last post by Bill_S on November 09, 2017, 04:05:25 PM »
The right blade does looks oddly mounted.

Did the tech work with the skater's feedback for best placement? Usually they mount the blades with screws in just the slotted adjustment holes until the skater finds the best position, then a few permanent screws are inserted into the other holes to make sure the blade doesn't move.

From first appearances, I'd agree with the coach. It looks wrong, at least in the photo.
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