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14
The Pro Shop / Re: Health question
« Last post by FigureSpins on September 20, 2017, 09:10:30 AM »
Being short causes figure skating.

 :laugh: Small of stature and love figure skating? Count your blessings!
15
The Pro Shop / Re: Health question
« Last post by nicklaszlo on September 20, 2017, 04:34:01 AM »
Many elite figure skaters are told to underfeed themselves, to keep their weight down - especially female Dance and Pairs skaters, who need to be lifted by their partners.

But Dance and Pairs males are often tall, so they are strong enough to lift the lady.

This is a myth.  Size difference is not necessary for lifts.  The elite pairs men are strong enough to lift other pairs men.  A trained, elite male athlete is strong enough to lift four normal women.

Removing should be an effective way to improve jumps, though.
16
The Pro Shop / Re: Health question
« Last post by nicklaszlo on September 20, 2017, 04:22:31 AM »
Im 12 and 115 lbs.

Based on CDC data, that is slightly above average for a 12 year old female.  25% of adult females weigh less.

Can skating cause you to be short or bowlegged?

Being short causes figure skating. 
17
The Pro Shop / Re: Health question
« Last post by Peach on September 19, 2017, 06:39:35 PM »
I am seeing a dr. Im 12 and 115 lbs. solid muscle and eat very well. Was just curious if anyone heard of such a thing.
18
The Pro Shop / Re: Health question
« Last post by AgnesNitt on September 19, 2017, 04:40:39 PM »
Yes i stopped growing suddenly

If this is concerning you, you should see your doctor. However, girls stop growing between 11 and 15. It's a wide spread. The bowlegs may be treatable by a doctor if you are young enough.

There are also vitamin deficiencies that can cause bowlegs, and you should see your doctor to get checked out for that.
19
The Pro Shop / Re: Health question
« Last post by tstop4me on September 19, 2017, 03:52:02 PM »
Yes i stopped growing suddenly
If your question pertains to your actual state of health (rather than a hypothetical question in general), then I agree with FigureSpins:  see your physician. 
20
The Pro Shop / Re: Health question
« Last post by Query on September 19, 2017, 01:04:19 PM »
I have no medical training, so don't take these statements as authoritative.


Many nutrition issues can make you short.

  I've met a few elite female figure skaters who were told to malnurish themselves, to delay maturity. I've not met any male figure skaters who were told that.

  Many elite figure skaters are told to underfeed themselves, to keep their weight down - especially female Dance and Pairs skaters, who need to be lifted by their partners.

  A very few female ice dancers and pairs skaters use surgery to lose weight. I don't know what such surgery does to your health.

  Even if they don't deliberately malnurish themselves, many serious athletes feel they are too busy to take the time to eat right, though a good coach might try to correct that.

OTOH, there is a selection factor - being short (like being thin) may help you be a better freestyle skater, though I don't know all the reasons. (But Dance and Pairs males are often tall, so they are strong enough to lift the lady.) I wouldn't be surprised if that is at least big a contributor to the tendency of figure skaters to be short.

(But hockey skaters tend to be big bruisers overall, including somewhat tall, because hockey is a combat sport. Maybe having a little extra reach helps too. So there is a selection factor in hockey AGAINST small people, especially at elite levels.)


But why would skating make you bow-legged?

I suppose it is possible a very cautious newbie skater, who tries to always stay on the inside edges of both skates, might make themselves slightly bow-legged, if they skated A LOT. In addition, beginner skate often are mounted with the blades slightly to the inside, which might create such a posture, to a small extent. A poor skate tech might have mounted your blades that way on even non-beginner skates, which maybe could create such a problem - which is one more reason to argue that you should only use first class skate techs.

Many hockey skaters do deliberately skate on the inside edges of both skates for balance, but very few really good (e.g., NHL) hockey skaters look appreciatively bow-legged.

Of course, skates are not as good as other shoes at correcting bow-leggedness, because you don't have as much surface in contact at one time. (From what I can tell, podiatrists sometimes use "wedge" orthotics in other shoes to correct it a little - but the physics mostly doesn't work in skates.)

But I think a good figure skating coach would try to train out such a postural/gait issue, if it is small enough, because figure skating is an appearance sport. In addition, I wonder if bow-leggedness would interfere with pushing efficiently? And if it would affect your ability to land jumps, without injury to your knees? I used to let my knee bend slightly to the outside, as I landed. A coach made me try to correct that. When I was slow to correct it, it helped create knee pain.

(I bet short and long track speed skating can create other postural problems - because you are almost always leaning far to the left, on both blades.)


Any sport can and likely will cause a variety of physical problems specific to that sport, as can the physical training programs you use to be better at it. Just like not getting into ANY sport or physical activity can cause a variety of physical problems too.


But like I said, I'm not medically trained.

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