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Author Topic: Off ice edge trainer  (Read 1471 times)

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Offline jbruced

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Off ice edge trainer
« on: November 05, 2015, 08:12:44 AM »
I did a search for the Off Ice Edge Trainer but only found that it was mentioned on this forum. Has anyone here used it? What are your opinions about it?

Offline Isk8NYC

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Re: Off ice edge trainer
« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2015, 10:36:01 AM »
The price is prohibitive, so not many people use it.  There's a discussion in our archives about it:
 http://skating.zachariahs.com/skatingforums/www.skatingforums.com/archive/index.php/t-31067.html

It's static balance, not kinetic, which is more difficult but helps build strength faster.  I tried it at a PSA conference and I could see/feel the value for skaters learning figures or edges.  The training can be somewhat replicated with a plastic spin trainer (aka: a spinner) or an angled floor such as sideways on a ramp.

The concerns I heard voiced by others are that it might cause blades to loosen (so does skating) and that the price is very high.  (It was carefully engineered and is made of quality materials-there's a relationship.)

The company should probably market it to Figures enthusiasts since they are most likely to appreciate the benefits of that training.  I wish they could lower the cost, though.  While I understand that the tool would be great for a group to share, our facility doesn't have a way to secure that expensive a tool.


PS - I found that using the search term "off-ice edge trainer" brought up more results than "off ice edge trainer"
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Offline jbruced

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Re: Off ice edge trainer
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2015, 02:55:11 PM »
Thank you Isk8NYC. I did notice the price ;-) If it is very effective it might be worth it. The company seems to be marketing towards those who wish to jump more than any other group. My thinking was it would be better marketed towards the school figures crowd and serious beginners that really need to develop edge control and leg strength before learning the jumps. Since school figures are only a small niche this might be better marketed to the MIF folks??

I recently started gliding to a complete stop on one foot and then try to hold the stopped position one the one foot. Once I started getting more than 1 or 2 seconds I started noticing an improvement in my skating and sense of balance. I think this off-ice edge trainer might be beneficial since I can only get to the ice rink once or twice a week. My main interest in skating is school figures and the pattern dances. At my age I have no interest in jumps.

Offline Query

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Re: Off ice edge trainer
« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2015, 04:58:28 PM »
Is the idea so original, it would be wrong to copy it?

I bet someone could make their own equivalent pretty cheap.

Maybe take a ream of photocopy paper, with a rubber sheet on top, and putting something like a pipe (or another rolled up ream) underneath. Ideally, drill a couple holes, and put something through them so nothing slips. Or get fancier: cut an appropriate diameter pipe or spool, and gluing on the rubber sheet. (BTW, I haven't tried either.)

Or just buy inline skates at the thrift store, and practice holding an edge on them. :)

I recently started gliding to a complete stop on one foot and then try to hold the stopped position one the one foot.

My reflexes are currently way too slow to hold that position for long on the ice. Strength is an issue too, but unless when can learn to react fast enough, it may be a lost cause.

Perhaps you could stabilize at first with those ballet balancing sticks - or cheap dowel rods, cross country ski poles, or discarded broken hockey sticks. How about a big helium balloon?


Offline riley876

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Re: Off ice edge trainer
« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2015, 05:20:12 PM »
Or just buy inline skates at the thrift store, and practice holding an edge on them. :)

As a static pose muscle training tool inlines might be more useful than the item in question,  due to having to engage the muscles & forward-back balance to stop them rolling away from underneath you.

As a dynamic actually skating in motion exercise, (i.e. figures) inline skates do require a somewhat different technique and set of muscles to hold an edge, so they might actually be a little counterproductive if ice skating is your one and only focus.   Still great for core work though, I suspect.    You can work the ice skating edge holding muscles on inlines, but it involves forcing edges (i.e. tracing a curve in the opposite direction to the boot lean), which is probably going to require a fair investment in your inlining skills to achieve.

Offline riley876

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Re: Off ice edge trainer
« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2015, 05:26:24 PM »
Also:

I've tried using elastic cords for edge training before.   

The idea is that you stand on a piece of cardboard on a hard floor,  and hook a cord around your ankle and attach it somewhere sideways of the ankle.   Now whilst pivoting on the ball of your foot, try to pull the ankle sideways against the cord.

For simulating backwards edges, it's the same but pivot on the heels and have the cord tied around the toes.

Can't say it really helped at all, but it was an interesting experiment.   But not a patch on actually skating.

Offline jbruced

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Re: Off ice edge trainer
« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2015, 06:32:50 PM »
Is the idea so original, it would be wrong to copy it?

I bet someone could make their own equivalent pretty cheap.

Maybe take a ream of photocopy paper, with a rubber sheet on top, and putting something like a pipe (or another rolled up ream) underneath. Ideally, drill a couple holes, and put something through them so nothing slips. Or get fancier: cut an appropriate diameter pipe or spool, and gluing on the rubber sheet. (BTW, I haven't tried either.)

Or just buy inline skates at the thrift store, and practice holding an edge on them. :)

My reflexes are currently way too slow to hold that position for long on the ice. Strength is an issue too, but unless when can learn to react fast enough, it may be a lost cause.

Perhaps you could stabilize at first with those ballet balancing sticks - or cheap dowel rods, cross country ski poles, or discarded broken hockey sticks. How about a big helium balloon?
The item has either been patented or is patent pending. According to the drawings it is three planar surfaces rather than an arc. There are probably some easy ways to DIY one.

Regarding the glide to a stop; the stop occurs on the flat rather than on an edge. The longest I have held the stop on one foot is about seven seconds. 4 to 5 seconds is getting pretty easy to do. I hope to get up to 10-12 seconds consistently. I am just beginning to notice that I can use my ankles to fine tune my edges since working on holding the stop on one foot.

I think the advantages to the off-ice edge trainer are 1) that I could do this training at home everyday rather make  100 mile round trip to the ice rink 2) that with the use of the poles one can hold the position longer and use the muscles to regain a balanced position rather than just stepping out of the position on the ice. While the item is pricey if it speeds up the process of being able to hold a balanced edge position it may somewhat reduce the cost of ice time and coaching thereby eventually paying for itself.

Offline twokidsskatemom

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Re: Off ice edge trainer
« Reply #7 on: November 30, 2015, 04:31:44 PM »
My skaters coach uses them for her winter off ice training and for skaters with injurys that  arent skating. She has at least 10 of them. We personally own one .
Its helps with not just edges but landing postions.

Offline rsk8d

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Re: Off ice edge trainer
« Reply #8 on: December 05, 2015, 08:53:12 PM »
The inventor of the Off-Ice Edge Trainer is a physical therapist who put a lot of time and research into this product.  He tested many skaters to find the exact angles for correct weight displacement for each edge, to mimic edges used on the ice, and it is not something that can easily copied.  It is actually very pricey to produce as well, hence the high cost.  I have used it with my skaters, and it is valuable component to an off-ice training routine, because it incorporates strengthening and balance together while on the blade, no in a sneaker. Because of the approximation of weight displacement on the blade, you can really work on a skater's alignment and biomechanics while on the OIE.  You can pin point an exact point in a jump takeoff where a skater may be having a biomechanical alignment or strength issue.
Visit www.sk8strong.com for off-ice training information, DVDs and more