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Sitting on the Boards Rink Side / Re: Custom boots
« Last post by Loops on Today at 09:27:03 AM »
I'm curious about these results as well.  Tstopforme, can you add a 5 option though for those of us who have never had customs?  You have to vote to see the poll results.....
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Sitting on the Boards Rink Side / Custom boots
« Last post by tstop4me on Today at 06:33:21 AM »
In theory, custom boots should provide the best fit for a skater's feet.  In practice, many things can go wrong, with the fitting or the manufacturing.  Off and on, I read horror stories posted.  But, of course, people tend to post when they're ticked, rather than pleased.  So, I'd like to take a comprehensive survey. 

I've limited the number of options in the poll, but the following information, along with the information requested in the options, would be useful in individual responses:

(1) What was the make and model of the boot?

(2) If you had to send them back, how many times did you have to send them back? 

(3) If you've ordered custom boots more than once, please report individual experiences.
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The Pro Shop / Re: Health question
« Last post by Leif on Today at 03:48:37 AM »
Query: Very interesting, whether this is a UK vs USA difference, or just our rinks, who knows. But interesting to hear your viewpoint.

When we knock each other over, we check that the other person is okay, and apologize, before carrying on. One lad does tend to skate into others and he is disliked by many. I guess this is because we play non contact and we are there to have fun and meet people. Not unlike many figure skaters I guess.

I think age influences injuries too, kiddies seem to fall over with impunity, maybe they are more rubbery, or just less tense. The injuries I've seen have almost all been casual skaters, the ones wearing 'death wellies' as someone once called them. A friend fell during ice hockey and landed on his jaw, causing injury, but I'd say it was his fault for not wearing a full face cage.
4
Rink Roundups / Re: Chicago, IL - Polk Bros Park at Navy Pier
« Last post by nicklaszlo on Today at 02:03:44 AM »
As of 2014 there were two rinks by Cloud Gate "the bean".  I posted a review of the new one here somewhere.
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I borrowed a Garmin Epix and a bluetooth heart rate monitor.  During my practice I recorded an average heart rate of about 160 beats per minute.  The lowest was 120 beats per minute (talking to my coach) and the highest was 210 beats per minute (program).  I don't know if heart rate really matters.
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The Pro Shop / Re: Health question
« Last post by Query on September 22, 2017, 05:24:35 PM »
I admit that a lot of my impression of hockey is from watching a few televised NHL and Olympic games. I suppose those players are indeed no more typical of your average hockey player than Olympic figure skaters are typical of the general class of figure and public skaters.

But I constantly see recreational hockey players, figure skaters, and public skaters at the rink where I work.

It is absolutely correct that not all the little hockey kids are huge or super-strong, though you rarely see ones who are tiny for their age. Some are just very athletic, and a lot of the kids, for some reason, are extremely hyperactive. But by the time you get to the adult leagues, especially the more advanced ones ones where "checking" contact is allowed, almost all the males are large and beefy. Even the ladies tend to be kind of scrappy, though they don't tend to be nearly as large and strong-looking as the males. (A lot of the adult hockey leagues here are coed.)

In addition, there are a fair number of injuries here as a result of non-cooperative physical contact with other hockey players. It seems obvious that being larger and stronger than your competitors will tend to reduce the frequency and seriousness of those injuries in hockey.

There are a fair number of figure skating and public skating injuries here too - but I think most of those aren't caused by contact with other skaters - though I haven't tried to keep statistical records. That means that being larger and stronger than your peers and competitors isn't as important to injury avoidance in figure and public skating. An astonishing number of figure and public skating injuries here are from falls - for which being tall would presumably be something of a disadvantage, because there is a greater distance to fall, though I haven't confirmed that assumption. I also see some jump landing injuries among figure skaters; I'm not sure how being large and tall affects the likelihood of such injuries. I would assume that being overweight isn't good from a figure skating injury perspective, but maybe being ultra-light, from deliberate malnutrition, isn't so great either; I don't attend freestyle sessions, and never attended many, so am not sure. In truth, jump landing falls are a lot less common here.

It is certainly my impression that many kids who are small and thin are often encouraged to enter activities like figure skating, gymnastics, and some forms of dance, because it is thought that they can do well there. A lot of the best little figure skating kids here do all of those. AFAICT, a lot of big beefy male kids are likewise encouraged to enter activities like football and hockey. In fact there is a lot of overlap between adult males who have played both football and hockey, based on conversations I have had with some of the hockey players. I don't know how much of that is physical, and how much is attitude.

So, while those stereotypes aren't universal, they aren't atypical either. I think it makes sense to choose your sports based on your body.

I have seen a much greater range of physical types among kayakers, both recreational and elite. Backpackers too, though I never knew much of the elite competitive crowd there.

P.S. I see no obvious dominant physical types among the public skaters, except for those who also figure skate or play hockey. And there actually is some overlap here between figure skaters and hockey players, so it is obvious the stereotypes can't be completely accurate. Also, this is just one rink. There was a time when we produced some elite competitive figure skaters, but at this time we generally don't produce the best figure or hockey skaters.

But the main original question: because of the selection factor, I don't think it would be easy to prove or disprove that figure skating makes you short. But I see absolutely no tendency for many skaters here to be obviously bow-legged. It would be interesting to know whether all the extra gear that goalies wear could do that - they do walk funny with the gear - maybe even a little bow-legged. But I haven't noticed it after they take the gear off.
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The Pro Shop / Re: Health question
« Last post by Leif on September 21, 2017, 07:27:36 AM »
Ah, but your sampling population is rec teams, and that's far different from the NHL, Olympic, or NCAA teams [that's like making conclusions about figure skaters by observing a public session].  There have been many studies of the potential effect of intensive sports on growth in children, and many are flawed from improper statistical sampling and analysis ... with some concluding that gymnastics stunts the growth of young girls, and basketball enhances the growth of young girls.   ;)

From this link:

http://www.livestrong.com/article/516389-body-characteristics-of-hockey-players/

Quote: "There is no one defined body type for forwards. Players with a more muscular physique are better able to take a hit and keep on going, but smaller and faster players have been among the most successful players in the game's history. "

Goalies do tend to be big, even the women, but that is so they block more of the goal!!!!

Query referred to hockey players in general, not professional hockey players. I do think it worth commenting on his statement, because it might turn people off hockey when in fact lighter and thinner types such as me can successfully participate as long as they have enthusiasm, endurance and skating ability. Despite being 54 I have more energy than many of the lads half my age. And I can steal the puck from the big chaps too.

Also have a watch of hockey training sessions on YouTube, you might realise that it is not a bunch of thugs having a fight, though sadly that does happen during games. There is an awful lot of athleticism and skill involved, as there is of course in figure skating. ;D

I read that running leads to stronger leg bones. I used to do long distance running for 30 years. It might be that skating has a similar effect, though I have no evidence, just a guess.

Anway, I made no comment on growth as I don't know. I do think giving a child a poor diet to enhance their performance is wicked though.
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The Pro Shop / Re: Health question
« Last post by tstop4me on September 21, 2017, 06:45:34 AM »
A bit off topic, however:

I would argue that hockey is not a combat sport and that it is a game of considerable skill, although there is some aggression in the contact versions. Watch Sidney Crosby play and you will see what I mean. As to size, I have no data but from looking at recreational hockey some of the best players I have seen are actually fairly small, and some might be called weedy. But they are highly skilled skaters and stick handlers, who can skate the socks off the opposition. All of the coaches that I have come across have been lean, not obviously muscular, and range in height from small to average. Of course there will be some players that are chosen because they are big and can flatten opponants. I know one chap who is big, and despite limited skating ability he was asked to join a rec. team and my guess is that his size was a key reason. But you can't have all big lads. And in fact a lot of the players in the rec games I attend are women, and very good they are too. I recall making a few passes to one particular lass (woman) and on each occasion she'd scoot off to the other end of the rink and take a shot at the goal, very good play indeed. As I say, I have no proper data, just my observations here in the UK. Are you perhaps thinking of sumo wrestling? The two are easily confused.  :)
Ah, but your sampling population is rec teams, and that's far different from the NHL, Olympic, or NCAA teams [that's like making conclusions about figure skaters by observing a public session].  There have been many studies of the potential effect of intensive sports on growth in children, and many are flawed from improper statistical sampling and analysis ... with some concluding that gymnastics stunts the growth of young girls, and basketball enhances the growth of young girls.   ;)
9
The Pro Shop / Re: Health question
« Last post by Leif on September 21, 2017, 04:17:52 AM »
A bit off topic, however:

(But hockey skaters tend to be big bruisers overall, including somewhat tall, because hockey is a combat sport. Maybe having a little extra reach helps too. So there is a selection factor in hockey AGAINST small people, especially at elite levels.)

I would argue that hockey is not a combat sport and that it is a game of considerable skill, although there is some aggression in the contact versions. Watch Sidney Crosby play and you will see what I mean. As to size, I have no data but from looking at recreational hockey some of the best players I have seen are actually fairly small, and some might be called weedy. But they are highly skilled skaters and stick handlers, who can skate the socks off the opposition. All of the coaches that I have come across have been lean, not obviously muscular, and range in height from small to average. Of course there will be some players that are chosen because they are big and can flatten opponants. I know one chap who is big, and despite limited skating ability he was asked to join a rec. team and my guess is that his size was a key reason. But you can't have all big lads. And in fact a lot of the players in the rec games I attend are women, and very good they are too. I recall making a few passes to one particular lass (woman) and on each occasion she'd scoot off to the other end of the rink and take a shot at the goal, very good play indeed. As I say, I have no proper data, just my observations here in the UK. Are you perhaps thinking of sumo wrestling? The two are easily confused.  :)
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The Pro Shop / Re: Anything Further On the Jackson Debut? Comparisons with Freestyle?
« Last post by sampaguita on September 21, 2017, 02:54:25 AM »
There's a thread on the Debut here. A major difference between the Freestyle and the Debut, aside from the stiffness, is the fit of the boot. You can check out the rest here: http://skatingforums.com/index.php?topic=7744.0
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