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Sitting on the Boards Rink Side / Re: Change of concussion recovery standards
« Last post by lutefisk on May 24, 2017, 09:58:45 AM »
I guess, by the new standards, you didn't have to, since your moves test wouldn't have involved jumping, and I assume you wouldn't have fallen during a moves test. Unless, of course, your symptoms were serious enough to affect your sense of balance. When it comes right down to it, easy skating should be perfect - a gentle low impact physical activity. Maybe it should be prescribed... Though not, I think, for beginning skaters, who do fall a lot anyway, sometimes without much control. Also not for kids and certain others who wouldn't be able to restrain themselves from jumping, and not for hockey players in general, who are universally quite unable to be easy on their bodies.

After my head trauma, although I was supposed to take several 15 minute walks each day, I wasn't allowed to climb stairs for the first two weeks post-op.  Skating, driving cars or even taking long rides in a car as a passenger (increased seizure risk; something to do with flickering light patterns even in daylight conditions) were off limits for roughly 5 weeks post-op.  I was finally cleared to drive a car, skate (gently), return to work and resume other normal activities two months after surgery.  It was an additional three months before I felt confident enough on ice to resume coached dance lessons.  Each head injury is unique but none are trivial.
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Sitting on the Boards Rink Side / Re: Change of concussion recovery standards
« Last post by Query on May 24, 2017, 08:37:42 AM »
Missed my bronze moves test.

I guess, by the new standards, you didn't have to, since your moves test wouldn't have involved jumping, and I assume you wouldn't have fallen during a moves test. Unless, of course, your symptoms were serious enough to affect your sense of balance. When it comes right down to it, easy skating should be perfect - a gentle low impact physical activity. Maybe it should be prescribed... Though not, I think, for beginning skaters, who do fall a lot anyway, sometimes without much control. Also not for kids and certain others who wouldn't be able to restrain themselves from jumping, and not for hockey players in general, who are universally quite unable to be easy on their bodies.
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Interesting. Their catalog

  http://www.soletech.com/image/soletech_catalogs/soletech_orthopedic_catalog_2010.pdf

provides very little information about what they sell - but they do seem like a good source, though $25 is a lot for that sheet.

EVA, according to

  What is the Difference Between EVA and Polyurethane Midsoles?

a good read, is used in high end athletic shoes - mostly shoes that are thrown out after 3 - 6 few months, because it is relatively light, but but it has a fair bit of compression set i.e., it changes shape and looses its cushioning and bounce. Extreme ultralight is a lost cause in figure skates - maybe I'd rather go for polyurethane's durability.

My attempt (trial in athletic shoes, heavily used for fitness training) to use the cheap stuff (the Walmart/Ozark Trail camping mat) has so far been partially successful. It now just feels normal as insoles go - but it is no longer particularly bouncy. I think one wants something that is somewhat bouncy, for jumping. But it feels a lot more durable than the carpet padding, which wasn't bouncy at all. It's certainly a cheap way to get a lot of bulk foam, without having to buy hundreds of square yards. All these camping pads are is one big piece of foam, cut to a specific rectangular size (about 8 ounces of it; ultralight backpacking fanatics cut it down further, to the size and shape of their bodies to make it even lighter), so it isn't surprising it's cheap.

I contacted Therm-a-Rest about their blue foam camping pad, which was on clearance from REI. Their pad is mostly polyethylene ("This material is mostly polyethylene with a small component, less than 10 percent, EVA.  Probably between 4 and 9%."), which, according to various sources, has more compression set than the polyolefin" in the cheaper Walmart/Ozark Trail mat. But I was very pleased one of their tech guys,    
James Nakagami, was willing to have an extended discussion about it.

He knew it wasn't his field, so he recommended Superfeet, which are expensive and didn't work out so well for me - though, to be honest, that was before I realized you can completely reshape insoles to do what you want. I've been making insoles for myself for a long time, and have mostly been happier than with the commercial products.

I wonder how well cork works - how well it cushions, how bouncy it is, how durable it is... It's been used a lot in for high end ski boots. Partly because it heat molds to the shape of the foot fairly easily (in other words, when you heat it, it has a lot of compression set.), a lot of ski stores do that.

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Sitting on the Boards Rink Side / Re: My goals were very simple after all
« Last post by fsk8r on May 24, 2017, 12:52:33 AM »
Looking at the ice: haven't you had that dream where you are skating along and all of a sudden you are in a swimming pool?

That could happen!  You need to look down to make sure it doesn't!! ::>)

Given that the competition I entered was cancelled for this very reason, it's a vital skill to develop!
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Sitting on the Boards Rink Side / Re: My goals were very simple after all
« Last post by Loops on May 24, 2017, 12:16:23 AM »
Looking at the ice: haven't you had that dream where you are skating along and all of a sudden you are in a swimming pool?

That could happen!  You need to look down to make sure it doesn't!! ::>)

Lol!! Icedancer you crack me up!!!
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Sitting on the Boards Rink Side / Re: My goals were very simple after all
« Last post by icedancer on May 23, 2017, 07:09:48 PM »
Looking at the ice: haven't you had that dream where you are skating along and all of a sudden you are in a swimming pool?

That could happen!  You need to look down to make sure it doesn't!! ::>)
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Sitting on the Boards Rink Side / Re: My goals were very simple after all
« Last post by ChristyRN on May 23, 2017, 06:59:32 PM »
It took me 3 years to not have to remind myself to not look down at the ice all the time.

I've been at it 15 years and still look down. It's the hardest $*%#*( habit to break. I tell my coach I want to see where I'm going to land when I fall.
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Sitting on the Boards Rink Side / Re: USFSA Governing Council 2017
« Last post by DressmakingMomma on May 23, 2017, 04:37:00 PM »
We are in the UGL region. Two years ago, just test track pre-pre had 3 or 4 flights with at least 14 skaters in each flight. The have a QR and then a final round, so even though it is non-qualifying, it is still a great competition. With my daughter's age and current skating level, I just can't imagine she will get to the point of being able to skate a well-balanced, qualifying event at regionals before becoming and adult, so I really appreciate the opportunity for her to skate in test track events at regionals, even if they are non-qualifying.
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Sitting on the Boards Rink Side / Re: My goals were very simple after all
« Last post by amy1984 on May 23, 2017, 01:53:51 PM »
It took me 3 years to not have to remind myself to not look down at the ice all the time.

but what if it goes somewhere??  ;)
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Sitting on the Boards Rink Side / Re: My goals were very simple after all
« Last post by Jf12 on May 23, 2017, 11:46:44 AM »
It took me 3 years to not have to remind myself to not look down at the ice all the time.
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