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Author Topic: Off-ice training reports  (Read 50524 times)

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Offline ONskater74

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #100 on: September 30, 2013, 08:55:25 PM »
Have a month of formal private ballet instruction behind me now, and I seem to be getting into the swing of things. I still struggle with the French terminology...  The whole process seems to be helping me as much as any one particular thing. It is a bit difficult to set aside certain skating things and work on dance, but the mental shift is good discipline.
I'm getting better at arm positions.... New slippers should arrive next week...keep working on turnout from the hip, straighten the back of the knee...stretch and point those feet... :o :P

Offline 4711

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #101 on: October 01, 2013, 07:45:44 AM »
before long they will have you hoist the ladies!  ;)
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Offline iomoon

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #102 on: October 11, 2013, 07:43:45 PM »
Splits: almost there!  :o After that milestone, I will try for a higher spiral and biellman position.

I think I've gotten used to my trainer's intense sets and repetitions. I feel sore but not dead.  ;) He was starting to wonder if the 55 pound dead weights were too light for four 1 minute sets...  :sad: Don't make it too hard!

Offline iomoon

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #103 on: November 06, 2013, 03:42:08 PM »
I learned that doing regular exercise with minimal anxiety is more effective than trying too hard.

At the peak of my exercise routine years ago (no skating), I could do planks up to 2 minutes with strain.

On Sunday, however, I hit 2 1/2 minutes with no strain and let go because I was bored!  :o

omg... skating and cross-training for the fun of it is awesome!  :stars:

Offline Cush

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #104 on: November 06, 2013, 10:15:26 PM »
Wow! That is awesome. Congratulations!
I can hold plank for only 65s. Haven't tried for some time though :-[
You must have some super abs.

Offline iomoon

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #105 on: November 08, 2013, 12:35:43 AM »
Wow! That is awesome. Congratulations!
I can hold plank for only 65s. Haven't tried for some time though :-[
You must have some super abs.

Thanks Cush. I was at that point, too, so it's possible! You can do it.  :stars:

Humble pie: I can't do a sit-up without assistance.  :nvm:

Offline FigureSpins

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #106 on: November 08, 2013, 08:33:05 AM »
Thanks Cush. I was at that point, too, so it's possible! You can do it.  :stars:

Humble pie: I can't do a sit-up without assistance.  :nvm:

To get started, put a couch pillow or exercise ball behind your back and a wall/couch.  Then you can start out with less distance to sit up.  Crunches are also an alternative - you don't have to do the entire range of motion.
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Offline slcbelle

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #107 on: November 19, 2013, 09:13:18 AM »
Of course I decide in mid November that biking to the rink, which is only 2.9 miles from home, is a great warm up.  I rode to the rink on Friday and it was great.  But today we're going to get rain/snow so forget that.  I'll ride on my trainer in my home gym later.  Thought I could save some time by doing my daily cardio to and from the rink but I know I won't be one of those Salt Lakers riding a bike in the snow.  Uphill.  Nuh uh.

In other news, I just ordered a Thera-Band Rocker board to help with my dorsiflexion (BEND!) and balance.  I'll progress to a Wobble board once I feel my dorsiflexion has improved significantly.  The Rocker has a 30% angle of deflection whereas the Wobble has 22%.  I need all the stretching I can get so I chose the Rocker.

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Offline iomoon

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #108 on: November 22, 2013, 06:47:38 PM »
I declare the hip thrust the dirtiest weight training exercise.  :o eheh... thrusted 115 pounds.

Offline iomoon

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #109 on: November 22, 2013, 06:50:18 PM »
To get started, put a couch pillow or exercise ball behind your back and a wall/couch.  Then you can start out with less distance to sit up.  Crunches are also an alternative - you don't have to do the entire range of motion.

Thanks! I like doing the bicycle crunches. They might be better for me anyway.  :sweat

Offline jjane45

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #110 on: November 22, 2013, 09:02:54 PM »
a friend is really into biking and I'm seriously considering to bike regularly mostly for fitness since I don't ever seem to lose weight however I skate, diet is fine.

so the question is, is biking a good complementary sport for figure skating?

Offline sarahspins

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #111 on: November 22, 2013, 09:50:20 PM »
It can be, if you are careful about stretching your hip flexors and not overbuilding your quads compared to your hamstrings.  To be honest, I'm skeptical about the claims that cycling always disproportionately builds quads - if you cycle clipless, your hamstrings will get a decent workout too unless you are on a tri bike (the geometry is different, meant to "save" your hamstrings for the running portion of a tri, but I haven't found this to be the case on a normal road or hybrid bike - I know I definitely use my hamstrings because when I overdo it, those are the muscles that end up cramping). 

Offline jjane45

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #112 on: November 23, 2013, 01:13:33 AM »
It can be, if you are careful about stretching your hip flexors and not overbuilding your quads compared to your hamstrings.  To be honest, I'm skeptical about the claims that cycling always disproportionately builds quads - if you cycle clipless, your hamstrings will get a decent workout too unless you are on a tri bike (the geometry is different, meant to "save" your hamstrings for the running portion of a tri, but I haven't found this to be the case on a normal road or hybrid bike - I know I definitely use my hamstrings because when I overdo it, those are the muscles that end up cramping).

thank you for your insight! I'm not going on serious rides anytime soon, but still certainly keep that in mind :)

Offline jjane45

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #113 on: November 30, 2013, 07:33:44 PM »
biking, more intensive than I ever biked in my life. Great workout but I have to watch out for "too much too soon", that left knee may not like it too much after previous abuses like jogging and sit spins.

Offline sarahspins

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #114 on: November 30, 2013, 08:29:53 PM »
If your knees are bothering you or you think that you're getting close to that point, I would suspect that your cadence (how fast you are pedaling) is much too low.  You want to try to keep it at least 60rpm (higher than 60 is fine), any lower and you're putting much too much stress on your joints and muscles.  Cycling should be very easy on your knees and hips, so if increasing your cadence doesn't help, I would suspect a fit issue, in which case a simple change to how your bike is set up could make a big difference, but you'll probably want to enlist the help of someone local for that :)

Offline jjane45

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #115 on: November 30, 2013, 09:25:57 PM »
planning to get a new bike tomorrow :) yes suspected the current old mountain bike is an issue, did not think about cadence though. wonderful tips and thank you again sarahspins <3<3

Offline ONskater74

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #116 on: December 01, 2013, 07:10:02 AM »
I've been working on single rotation ballet jumps where you plie in 5th jump up and point and rotate one full turn and land in a plie in 5th. I have no problem with a single rotation. I'm wondering if anyone here can tell me if this will help me when it is time to start working beyond a waltz jump? I think my biggest issue right now is a lack of takeoff thrust on the ice, whereas off the floor I have lots. I may try crossing my feet and folding in my arms while doing the ballet jumps at home just to get the feel of it. I can do 1 1/2 rotation ballet jump quite handily, but whether I can translate this into an axel remains to be seen.

Offline jjane45

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #117 on: December 01, 2013, 11:20:42 PM »
Cycling should be very easy on your knees and hips, so if increasing your cadence doesn't help, I would suspect a fit issue, in which case a simple change to how your bike is set up could make a big difference, but you'll probably want to enlist the help of someone local for that :)

went to the "nice" local bike shop with my friend today, they did not have the bike I considered in my size.

there is definitely a fit issue going on. looks like I've been riding with my knees fully extended. need to bring the seat down a bit.

Offline iomoon

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #118 on: December 07, 2013, 02:49:15 AM »
Sprints and push-ups with rows. I was feeling lightheaded so we stopped.  :-\

My blood pressure is consistently higher than normal for the past 6 months. This might be due to the doubling of my medicine. I asked my doctor about my concerns. He checked me 3 times... 140/95, 130/90, and 120/80. He said that was normal, but I said "that's not normal for ME." I used to have 110/75  or below with a resting heart rate of 55.

Trainer said to eat 1 1/2 hours before working out. I will have to do that consistently and see if my medicine is causing lightheaded feelings or not.

Offline Query

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #119 on: December 07, 2013, 05:33:32 PM »
A lot of people get custom bike frames, and customize what equipment is mounted on those frames, and how. That adds to the cost.

I wonder if a good fitter is just as important for bikes as for skates. I hope you visit lots of bike shops to see if something already feels right.

I never quite figured out what the optimal frame configuration is. It's not just the height of the seat that had to be right, but also the forward/backwards position of the seat relative to the wheels, handlebars, brake and shift controls, the height of the pedals above the ground, how far you have to lean forwards to put your hands on the handlebars or reach the brakes and gear shift, and some things I never understood about how well the bike balances, tracks and turns. (E.g., if you have to remove your hands from the wheels for a second or two, does it go straight? Do the pedals drag and catch if you lean into a turn? Is a lean enough to turn?) Also, how comfortable the seat is to sit and pedal on long term. Also, is there any way your pants (or skirt or dress, as appropriate) can get caught in the chain or gears? Is there anything to block dirt and grease and rain from the chain and tires from being thrown onto your clothing? How easily can you remove your feet from your pedals if you have to in a hurry? Is there a good way to mount a decent bike pump - little ones may take a size-able portion of an hour to use, and the little gas cylinders are bad news if you do it wrong the first time. Is there a good waterproof place to carry your tools, repair instructions, lock/cable and whatever you need with you on the trip? Lights and horn are good. For people who get lost like me, a GPS would be fantastic. How hard is it to lock all components securely? Some of these things are somewhat adjustable or interchangeable, some not.

I'm pretty sure that I liked a different configuration best when I was sitting and standing tall on the pedals. Also that everything about the feel changed when I went up a hill. I like having a very low gear, and a very high gear, but maybe that's because I was never a great athlete.

When I bought my Viscount Sebring ten speed half a zillion years ago, the user manual told me how to balance the wheels, adjust and replace the brakes, adjust and lube the derailers, chain, and cables, how to lube and replace the wheel bearings, how to adjust seat height and forward position, and the configuration of the handlebars, how to repair and change tires on the road, etc. I knew nothing about tools, but I had no problem following the simple well written and illustrated directions.

I'm told that as the number of gears has increased, "click" derailers have taken over, and custom tools have become more common, fewer people can maintain their own bikes. My local REI charges more for a "deluxe" bike "tune-up" than I spent for my ten speed, even allowing for inflation. In addition, most bikes you buy from the store are custom configured to some extant - there might be one set of manuals for the various components of the gear system, another for the brake system, etc.

But it is worth while to look at the available documentation to see if you can do the most common repairs on the road. Find out from the shop what it would cost to get the tools and documentation to get the chain back on the gears, re-adjust the gears and brakes to the extant that they work reasonably well if something goes wrong, and replace and re-inflate the tires. All those are often needed unexpectedly on the road, so it may be worth getting the tools and practicing at home.

The information clarity and availability, and the tools required, varies substantially according to the equipment on the particular bike.
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Offline ONskater74

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #120 on: December 07, 2013, 06:36:43 PM »
I ride a 1960's Raleigh, olive green 3 speed. Generator built into the front hub, headlight taillight, parcel rack over rear fender, Nottingham England..... old tired hand brakes front and rear.

Getting ready for a Tweed Run if it ever comes to a small town near me  :)
To shift up or down you stop pedaling, click the thumb lever, and then resume pedaling. Headlight riding after dark can be a real dicey proposition... :P

Offline iomoon

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #121 on: January 10, 2014, 03:36:36 AM »
I hate it when we do small upper muscles. I feel fatigued when we do them. @___@

Offline iomoon

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #122 on: January 17, 2014, 01:02:52 AM »
Instructor made me do 4 sets of squats, pull downs and boxer sit-ups.... 15-20 reps each.

Then I tripped over the handicapped crane at the pool.  :nvm: I am sore all over.

Offline PhysicsOnIce

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #123 on: January 17, 2014, 07:52:04 AM »
I've been working on single rotation ballet jumps where you plie in 5th jump up and point and rotate one full turn and land in a plie in 5th. I have no problem with a single rotation. I'm wondering if anyone here can tell me if this will help me when it is time to start working beyond a waltz jump? I think my biggest issue right now is a lack of takeoff thrust on the ice, whereas off the floor I have lots. I may try crossing my feet and folding in my arms while doing the ballet jumps at home just to get the feel of it. I can do 1 1/2 rotation ballet jump quite handily, but whether I can translate this into an axel remains to be seen.
Rotations will always help, whether it be ballet rotations or skating rotations, to make you more aware of your in air position. Keep in mind that when you do jump on the ice you do want to get a nice deep plie on one single leg. For me it helps specially, on my loop and double loops,  to think plie into my take off and tendue out of it. It has helped me to get my in flight position much straighter. As for skating rotations, you want to make sure you keep the same technique as your ballet rotations, but come from parallel, pull your arms in over your right side ( I actually dont cross, but push my right shoulder slightly with my right hand and the left hand wraps around my waist... some coachs think it is strange but I feel much more secure) and "land" your jump.  When you feel comfortable with that rotation, walk through your axel take off making sure you get a good snap into your rotation position.
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Offline iomoon

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Re: Off-ice training reports
« Reply #124 on: June 21, 2014, 04:17:06 AM »
Woah... it's been a long time. @___@

Splits without strain: achieved.  :o Uhhh... what should be my goal now? XDDD
Jogging at 6 mph as warmup: achieved. Man... I remember when I'd run out of breath at 5 mph!
Circuit training without dying: achieved... unless you throw burpees and sprints at me. XD  Burpees are evil!
Getting fiancé to use up my floating training sessions: achieved! I tease him because he gets sore, but I know he's a good sport. My trainer is a very patient and helpful person.

My back stretches out well, but I'm afraid of trying the Biellman position.  :o How does one try? (Or maybe I just shouldn't;;; )